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Myanmar, one of the biggest pulse producing countries in the planet, is having problems with crop harvest. Prices of pulses, as a result is shooting up.
31 Jan 2011
YANGOON (Commodity Online) : Myanmar, one of the biggest pulse producing countries in the planet, is having problems with crop harvest. Prices of pulses, as a result is shooting up.

Untimely rainfall in December and January has made a dull outcome of the December harvest of crops, according to U Tun Lwin, the chairman of Myanmar Pulses, Beans and Sesame Seeds Merchants Association; reported Myanmar Times.

Average crop output of Myanmar is about 300,000 tons but the produce had fallen short of this figure by half in early 2010, due to bad weather, and the same story is finding resonance again in 2011; this time a bit better at 250,000 tons.

At the Bayintnaung export market, toor was being sold at K430,000 a ton in December while on January 7, the price increased by 25% to touch K540,000. The figures breached all boundaries by January 20 when it increased to K700,000.

In December, Myanmar exported 1000 tons of toor to India and hopes to continue with the same to the tune of 10,000 tons in January and excess of 30,000 tons in February.

The exporters there believe that India’s production of toor would be lower as major toor producing regions in India had experienced poor weather conditions.

India accounts for 70% of Myanmar’s pulses and beans exports.

According to a trader in a domestic exchange in Myanmar, fair to average quality toor was sold for $900 a ton. (More than 600 tons of pulses are consumed daily by the domestic market).

Meanwhile, black gram prices are also climbing.

By the end of December black gram had been selling for K620,000 a ton and surged to K650,000 by January 7. On January 20, matpe(black gram) sold for K 700,000.  About 2000 tons a week are being sold.

On January 20, the exchange price of fair to average quality black gram was $880 a ton.

India’s black gram import from Myanmar stood at 20,000 tons for December and is currently at 30,000 tons which is expected to recur on February and March even as crop harvest there would begin only by February.

Domestic black gram supply in India has been disrupted and would warrant imports, the traders in Myanmar believe.

Myanmar is reported to have earned $980 million from exports of 3 million tons of beans and pulses in the 2009-2010 fiscal year as against $806 million from exports of 1.5 million tons of beans and pulses in 2008-2009 financial year.











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